We accept



Wellington, New Zealand City Info
Destination Guide

Destination Guide
Asia
Australia & Oceania
Caribbean
Europe
Middle East
North America
South America

Australia and Oceania > New Zealand
Wellington




New Page 4

Rangitikei River Adventures

+64 800 655 747

Three hours north of Wellington there are two river adventures of one hour and three hour duration, and a white water jaunt. Experienced guides who provide instruction and safety gear accompany all trips. Also overnight camps in New Zealand's most beautiful canyons. If the rafting is not enough then a bungy drop into the canyon or a quick jet boat spin will provide an adrenalin filled experience.

 

Khandallah Summer Pool

+64 4 479 6644

Views, bush picnic, a park and a pool - what more could you want? Set in 60 acres of native bush in the affluent suburb of Khandallah you will find these two outdoor pools. The main pool is 30 meters long and the small children's pool is 30 centimeters deep. This unique facility includes walking tracks, picnic areas, streams and a children's play area. Changing rooms and a small shop are onsite and lifeguards patrol the pool during the summer open season. Admission and parking areas are free.

 

Island Bay Marine Education Center

64 4 383 8285

Discover Wellington's marine life without getting your feet wet. The laboratory has indoor and outdoor tanks enabling you to learn about, see and touch the marine wildlife in a safe learning environment. Have the kids pick up the spider starfish (yes like it sounds: long black legs and black body), feel the sea cucumber and handle a hermit crab. Admire the large array of seahorses the laboratory breeds. The crayfish are abundant too, although not for eating.

 

Mt Kaukau

+64 4 802 4860

Lesser known to Wellington visitors but favored by locals, Mt Kaukau rewards those who take the time to conquer its steep slopes, with stunning 360 degree panoramic views of the Wellington harbor basin and Cook Strait beyond. If ever you are likely to see the South Island, it will be from here. Entry points at Simla Crescent, Ngaio and Woodmancote Streets, Khandallah. This treat is also part of the Northern Walkway.

 

Wellington Zoo

04 381-6750

Founded in 1906, Wellington's zoological gardens have all the traditional attractions. Zoo management has recently extended and upgraded the facilities to include such features as the Tropical River Trail, New Zealand's newest and largest habitat exhibit. Zoo inhabitants include New Zealand natives such as the kiwi, the giant weta, the black stilt and the tuatara, as well as the more exotic species like the North American bison, the Nepalese red panda and the Sitatunga antelope.

 

Karori Wildlife Sanctuary

+64 4 920 9200

The Karori Wildlife Sanctuary is an ambitious 250 hectare project intended to restore and protect native flora and fauna within the city environment. A ground-breaking fence to deter predators has been especially designed and constructed and a weka breeding program is well established. Kiwis were recently released in the area. The secluded inner city valley will eventually incorporate educational facilities and a network of tracks.

 

Te Papa Tongarewa (Museum of New Zealand)

64 4 381 7000

Te Papa is New Zealand’s national museum, offering visitors a unique and authentic experience of this country’s treasures and stories. Prepare to be engaged, stimulated, and surprised!  At the heart of Te Papa are the stunning long-term exhibitions. They are enhanced by diverse short-term exhibitions and a captivating and distinctive events program - performances, talks, lectures, entertainments and more.

 

The Museum  is a forum for the nation to present, explore, and preserve the heritage of its cultures and knowledge of the natural environment in order to better understand and treasure the past, enrich the present, and meet the challenges of the future.

 

The Original Settlers of Wellington:  The Maori People

Maori people define themselves by their iwi (tribe), hapu (sub-tribe), maunga (mountain) and awa (river). Whanau is the name given to family - the term embraces immediate family, in-laws and all those connected by blood ties.

 

In recent years, the introduction of Maori language nests (kohanga reo) has revived the Maori language. At kohanga reo, preschool children are encouraged to speak in Maori. Primary and secondary schools build on this early immersion by including Maori in the curriculum.